A small group joined in to experience March on Lord Howe Island. This is the month it is possible to see all seabird species that breed on the island, and that was achieved with good sightings of all. Many of the waders were starting to change into their brighter breeding plumage before heading off for the journey to the Arctic regions for breeding. It was a fit group, and we went on all of the walks and enjoyed looking at plants, birds and geology along the way; and of course the Ned’s Beach marine walk and a snorkel off the glass bottom boat in the Lagoon. The last day gave us a great sighting- a new bird record for the island “ 8.45 am steps on the balcony and a rap on the door. Something is going on – news that a rare vagrant has turned up at the swamp near the airstrip We jumped into the bus down and there it was – a Semi-palmated plover – the first to be seen on the island” (the bird ended up staying around for about 2 weeks)

This was the first record of a Semi-palmated plover on Lord Howe Island

This was the first record of a Semi-palmated plover on Lord Howe Island

The group enjoying Red tailed tropicbirds off Malabar cliffs

The group enjoying Red tailed tropicbirds off Malabar cliffs

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